The Buckthorn Man Unocculted

Ask me anything.

I’ve got nothing to hide.

Ok Buckthorn Man.  Are you a misanthrope?

Hmmm, that’s a tough question; better define our terms first.  Per wikipedia:

Molière‘s character Alceste in Le Misanthrope (1666) states:

My hate is general, I detest all men;
Some because they are wicked and do evil,
Others because they tolerate the wicked,
Refusing them the active vigorous scorn
Which vice should stimulate in virtuous minds.

Ok, I confess: whether it be from honesty or hubris, I don’t know, it’s true, I do feel that way sometimes.  I barely saw a soul last week working at The Springs, and that was fine by me.

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To occult something is simply to hide it from view.  As Mark Passio explained in his Natural Law Seminar, people occult knowledge to create or preserve a power differential they use to their advantage.  Take the idea of satanism; what is the first thing it conjures up?  Mark was a priest in the church of satan, and when I heard him explain their 4 basic tenets, which he knew first-hand, it opened my eyes.

  1. Survival: self-preservation is the top priority
  2. Moral relativism: if it’s good for me, it’s good, if it’s bad for, me it’s bad
  3. Social Darwinism: it is right and desirable for an elite few to dominate the other 99.9999% of humanity
  4. Eugenics: who is allowed to procreate, and at what rate, must be controlled

That is satanism unocculted.

At the Scuppernong Springs Nature Trail, it is U.S. Highway 67 that has been unocculted.   The removal of huge colonies of black locust trees from both the north and south ends of the preserve, along with the buckthorn cutting, have exposed the sights and sounds of the highway to major portions of the trail.  I won’t occult the truth: this is very obnoxious, especially in winter, and worst of all, at night.  The bright, rolling headlights, intermittently blocked by trees, evoke the feeling of prison bars and clandestine interrogations; not very relaxing or natural.  And on Saturday night, it was one car after another… I don’t like it one bit.  We have to get some native shrubs planted and recreate a healthy understory.

Despite my deeper appreciation for those who prefer a wall of buckthorn to highway traffic, I continued to work the brush cutter last week at The Springs.  Tuesday was cold and I had to rest my water bottle in the relatively warm river to keep it from freezing solid.

Here is how it looked before I started…

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… and after

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It’s subtle.

While on my evening stroll, I got a call from my old friend, Randy Schilling, who came out to The Springs 2 years ago to harvest some oak, hickory and cherry logs.  He had some presents for me: vases and bowls turned with care into art on his wood lathe.

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Thanks Randy.  I love you man!

Friday was perfect and I worked on the south side of the river just upstream from the gaging station bridge.

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Again, before …

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… and after.

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I think this is the best use of my time now: solidify the gains that have been made in the last few years and prepare for the burn next spring.

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Yesterday I did some work on the south end of trail focusing on black locust.

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I took a walk as night fell …

See you at The Springs!

3 thoughts on “The Buckthorn Man Unocculted

  1. Pingback: Pat Witkowski Walks The Wauk | Scuppernong Springs Nature Trail

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